How to draw….

I had this book once called How to Draw a Cup of Coffee by Joy Sikorski and today I found her website here’s an example…

It just brings a smile to my face!

These are her words of Advice….

The How to Draw Survival Kit: a few tips about Drawing

Reflections:

Drawing is especially wonderful on a rainy day or on a long plane trip. In rough weather, chart bumps! Drawing and painting promote goodness in the world.

Not so tedious as a novel, more dependable than a computer, more important than a cellphone, and forget about television! – Drawing is a vacation in itself. It’s also good for your diet.

Think about prehistoric cave paintings – what lively mastodons!

I have done the math: Drawing actually doubles your fun.
(TIP: If you do not see immediate increase in fun, change the color you used for the sky).

Encouragement:
Please forget that gradeschool teacher who scoffed at your efforts. I’m shocked – shocked! at the numbers of grownups and kids who believe what some misguided so-called teacher said in criticism of their earnest drawing efforts. Humpf! (I feel very strongly about this.) What your teacher did not know is that you are as yet, “undiscovered!”

For the doubtful: You can draw, and you are a great artist. Don’t worry. Forget about the result, think of it as a notation, and trust that later on when you look back on it your minds eye will fill in the rest.

Don’t try too hard. Ambition should be set aside and fun should prevail.

I like cartoons because they are easier and promote a spirit of fun.

Keep your drawing in the center of the page, more or less, so that when you see you’ve produced a masterpiece, you don’t have to then hunt for an oddball frame size.

All artists great and small begin as a brave soul making a colorful smudge! So get out there and smudge!

Things you’ll need:

Always have $1 and a pen with you at all times.
(The $1 is to buy another pen, in case the first one runs out of ink.)

We are blessed to live in an age when there are about 10,000 different kinds of pens and pencils to choose from. You have to get somewhat good stuff, or paintbrush hairs will fall out, pencils will scratch instead of coloring, and paper will pucker. (Exception: Of course, in an emergency, the Great Artist uses whatever is at hand – excellent results have been acheived using only sand and Elmers glue.) Most important is that you pick materials that you enjoy using.

Pencils:
Prismacolor pencil Black 935 makes wonderful thick and thin lines and a feathered edge.

Pens:
My current favories are Pilot Varsity Black and Pentel EnerGel .7mm. If you’re a letter writer, take note: Pilot Varsity also comes in Pink! Test your pens in the store for the right feel. The ideal, for me, is the feel of writing on a banana with a ballpoint pen.

Colors:
Once you start drawing you’ll want to color too. I use Prismacolor colored pencils. I like their bright clean colors. If you like water, you’ll soon be in a paint mood. You can mix up lots of colors starting with just a few. Watercolors are tough if you want to do them properly, but fun if you are just playing around. Old Holland or Pelikan watercolors are rich and smooth.

Brushes:
I use Raphael brushes size 0, 3, 6. and a wider “10 Royal” brush for sky and water.

Paper:
The best paper is not too smooth, not too rough, and fairly heavy. Look at a few pads and see what appeals to you. Pads with spiral bindings will open flat, which is preferred.
A. L. Friedman Heavyweight Bond is a nice for pen or colored pencil. Watercolors need a heavier paper. Strathmore 400 has a little more texture and is a good spiral watercolor pad. “Aquarelle Arches watercolor block hot pressed 140# 9 x 12″ ” is great (and sounds so impressive too!)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.